Author: Michael Lovito

Entertainment Weekly is Going Monthly, and That’s a Shame

(Photos: Marc Hom for EW; Matthias Clamer for EW; Finlay MacKay for EW; Juco for EW; Dan Winters for EW; Art Streiber for EW; Ruven Afandor for EW (2))

 

One thing the youth of today, and certainly the youth of the future, will never understand is how many random magazines used to end up in people’s homes. I don’t know much about the magazine industry, but the way it seemed to work in the early to mid-2000s was that, if you were subscribed to one magazine, the publisher would try to get you to subscribe to their other titles by offering free issues, usually encased in a plastic baggy (a packing method that, for the sake of the environment, I hope my future kids never experience, either). Sometimes, for whatever reason, you’d keep getting these magazines. That’s how Entertainment Weekly entered my life. It was sent to us as a replacement for some other magazine my mom had subscribed to, and it just kept coming.

Read More

Vampire Weekend and Billie Eilish Are Welcome Outliers. Can They Become Revolutionaries Too?

(Photo on the left by Amy Harris/Invision/AP, Right by Ross Gillmore/WireImage)

The other day, a coworker of mine posted this preview of Vampire Weekend’s new album Father of the Bride by Mikael Wood in a slack channel, and I gave it a read. It’s a pretty standard and enjoyable look at the making of a highly anticipated album, but there’s one passage that caught my attention and caused me a bit of distress, and no, it’s not just because the LA Times uses quotation marks instead of italics for album titles:

Read More

I’d Like To Thank You All For Nothing At All: A Jeff Tweedy Live Review

This isn’t a picture from the show I saw him at, but he looked the same minus the hat. Photo by Josh Miller

There’s a part in Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back), Jeff Tweedy’s excellent memoir released last year, where he discusses Wilco’s collaboration with Billy Bragg on the Mermaid Avenue albums, a trilogy of records featuring the two artists playing the unrecorded music and lyrics of Woody Guthrie. Apparently, Bragg told the press that he chose Wilco for the project because he thought they were the “ultimate Midwest Americana red-dirt-band,” and, according to Tweedy, he never would have agreed to take part if he had heard that comment at the time. 

Read More

Reel Life Oscar Challenge Episode 10: 2003

Michael, Lars, and Kathleen discuss the Best Picture nominees of 2003. Is it the best Oscars year since 1994? They think it might be, and at the very least it was good enough to inspire some bad Boston accents and horse jokes. The films discussed are:

-The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (1:27)

-Lost in Translation (12:14)

-Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (22:17)

-Mystic River (30:51)

-Seabiscuit (42:24)

Jenny Lewis’s On the Line Satisfies Even When It Stretches

It’s probably not fair to think of Jenny Lewis as a “child star turned musician” anymore. After all, she made that pivot over twenty years ago when she formed Rilo Kiley, a perennially underrated indie band responsible for one of my favorite songs of all time, and proved she had real staying power as she transitioned gracefully into one-shot duo Jenny and Johnny with then-beau Johnathan Rice (a pairing that penned one of the best songs about the recession) and eventually her own well-regarded solo career. And yet, I couldn’t help but think of her thespian past, and how it must inform a lot of the artistic choices on her new album On the Line.

Read More

Reel Life Oscar Challenge: 2002

Michael, Lars, and Kathleen discuss merry murderesses, harried hobbits, worried women, incensed Irishmen and dance around the awkwardness of having to watch a Roman Polanski movie as they discuss the Best Picture nominees from 2002. The films discussed are:

-Chicago (1:21)

-Gangs of New York (18:21)

-The Hours (32:28)

-The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (44:15)

-The Pianist (57:09)

Page 1 of 5